General Information about Ecuador
Ecuador is a small country located in South America, limited at north and east with Colombia and to the south with Peru. 
Time Zone: Ecuador is located at -5 GMT (Eastern Standard Time zone). The Galapagos Islands are located -6 GMT, one hour less than Ecuador continent.
Population: Ecuador has about 18 million of habitants.
Spanish is the country's official language and many indigenous groups speaks Quichua language 
Religion: The official is Catholic.
Capital: Quito
Government: Democratic.
Taxes: The Galapagos National Park entrance fee and Galapagos Government Council-Transit Control Card can be prepaid thru us otherwise
can be paid in cash directly upon arrival to Galapagos. 
Galapagos National Park Children under 12 years old have 50 discount:
International travellers: US$100 for adults
Latin American countries: US$50 for adults
Ecuadorians: US$6 for adults
Galapagos Government Council-Transit Control Card - Migration Control Card: US$ 20.00 per person no discounts apply.

Domestic Flights & Luggage Allowance:
There is a 23-kg luggage allowance and a carry-on bag of 10-kg per passenger for all DOMESTIC flights including to the Galapagos Islands.
Emergency Numbers:
For emergencies dial 911 Police 101 Firefighters 102 Red Cross 258 2482. There are very good hospitals and medical services both in Quito and
Guayaquil. Almost all hotels have a doctor on call for emergencies. Pharmacies and drugstores are open 24 hours a day.
Phone:
To call another country dial 00 country code area code phone number.
Water: We suggest you drink bottled water throughout your trip.ature is 24C. 76F.
Electricity on board: 110 volts

Visiting the Galapagos Islands
There are two visits per day to the islands one in the morning and another in the afternoon. Our naturalist guides will take you directly to the
most fantastic and emblematic locations on each island and introduce you to the mysterious and wonderful secrets of its flora fauna and
geology walking hiking snorkeling or kayaking.
You will be part of a group up to 16 people named: albatross boobies cormorants dolphins or other.
Depending on the itinerary you will also alternate these activities with swimming on colorful sand beaches watching sea lions on a rocky shore
taking a tour of the Darwin Research Station and souvenir shopping. To get to our various sites we have two types of landing:
Dry Landings: Passengers step directly from a dinghy onto rocks or a dock. We recommend: walking shoes. Special care is highly
recommended when walking on wet rocks.
Wet Landings: The dinghy edges toward the beach where you step into knee-deep water assisted by crew members and guides. We
recommend: swimming suit or shorts walking shoes or sandals towel provided by the crew while disembarking

A hike on steep surfaces mostly comprised of rocks and broken up lava flows. The hikes usually last between two and three hours.
Please note: The degree of difficulty gives a general idea of what to expect. Most hikes are all right for the majority of people and the degree
of difficulty should not be a deterrent to taking part in them. Only if you have some major handicap you should consider staying aboard for the
hardest hikes. Please consult your guide if you have any questions.

The best way to experience the Galapagos Islands is by cruising. 

The Galapagos Islands, extensively explored and probed by a young Charles Darwin (paving the way for his theory of evolution and hence it being described as a living laboratory), are a true paradise of bright white beaches and crystal-clear waters that are home to a uniquely diverse abundance of wildlife, much of which is not found anywhere else on Earth.

Indeed, the Galapagos are perhaps the most fascinating zoological, botanical and geological wonder of the world. The islands are home to some of the oldest animals in the world, such as the Giant Tortoise, which can live for more than 100 years, as well as other reptiles of prehistoric appearance, such as the land and marine iguanas. Most of the birds of the archipelago are endemic and unique to this special part of the world, such as the Blue-footed and Masked Boobies, Galapagos Hawks, Pelicans and Darwin finches. The oldest animals of the Universe are here like the Giant Tortoises that live more than 100 years, other reptiles of prehistoric appearance like the land and marine iguanas. The penguins and sea lions can be seen swimming in the blue sea. Most of the birds of the archipelago are endemic such as blue footed and masked boobies, Galapagos hawks, pelicans, finches of Darwin. The cleared flamingos that have made of the islands a special habitat, the frigates and cormorants, are some samples of the wonders animals of this natural laboratory. In addition to an impressive flora endemic and unique in the world, make to this place a real paradise, declarated by UNESCO Natural Patrimony of the Humanity.

It is also possible to see a large variety of fauna in the brilliant seas of the Galapagos, such as penguins and sea lions, as well as small, multicoloured fish and enormous mammals, such as whales and sharks. This aquatic world is considered to be one of the seven most important places in the world of diving. And let's not forget the diverse flora also found in the Galapagos, all of which make the islands an extremely unique and fascinating place. As a result of this most special diversity, the islands are yet another of Ecuador's many regions that have been declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO.

 

 


 

GALAPAGOS ISLANDS DESCRIPTION

NAME SPANISH ORIGIN

NAME ENGLISH ORIGIN

AREA 
1km = 0,62ml

FAUNA

ISABELA
Queen of Spain

ALBERMARLE 
Duke of Albermarle

4588

Giant tortoise, lava lizards (Tropidurus albermarlensis), land iguana (cronolophus subcristatus), blue-footed booby, masked booby, Galapagos penguin, magnificent frigate bird, flightless cormorant.

SANTA CRUZ 
Holly Cross HMS

INDEFATIGABLEIndefatigable

986

Giant tortoise, lava lizards (Tropidurs albermarlensis), land iguana (Conolophus subscritatus), Hawaiian petrel, lava gull, Marine iguana.

FERNANDINA 
Ferdinand II,

NARBOROUGH Adm. Sir John Narborough

642

leaf – toed geckoes (Phyllodactylus galapagoensis), Blue footed Booby, Galapagos penguin, masked boody, Galapagos hawk,
Brown noddy tern, Flightless cormorant

SANTIAGO 
Spanish for James

JAMES 
King James II

585

Fur seal (lions), Galapagos hawk, Marine iguana, Flamingos, Darwin Finches, Hawaiian petrel, Blue – Footed booby,.

SAN CRISTOBAL 
Saint Christopher, 
Patron saint of sailors

CHATTAM 
William Pitt, first Earl of Chattam

558

Giant tortoises, Lava lizard (Tropidurus livittatus), Hawaiian petrel, Blue – footed booby, Masked booby, Red – footed booby, Great frigate bird, magnificent frigate bird, Galapagos storm petrel.

FLOREANA 
President Juan José Flores.

CHARLES
King Charles II

173

Waved Albatross, Giant tortoise, Leaf–toed geckoes (Phyllodactylus bauri), Lava lizard (Tropidurus gravi), Galapagos hawk.

MARCHENA 
Fray Antonio 
Marchena

BINDLOE 
Captain John Bindloe

130

Lava lizard (tropidurus habelii), Lava gull, Galápagos Hawk, Small ground finch.

ESPAÑOLA 
Spain

HOOD
Adm. Viscount Samuel Hood

60

Hood mockingbird, large cactus ground finch, Waved albatross, Blue – footed boody, Great frigate bird.

PINTA 
Caravel Pinta

ABINGDON
Earl of Abingndon

60

Small tree finch, Galapagos hawk, Yellow warbler, large tree finch, Lava Lizard (Tropidurus albemarlense).

BALTRA 
From USAF (wwII)

SOUTH SEYMOUR
Lord Hugh Seymour

27

Lava lizard (Tropidurus albermarlenis), Galapagos flycatcher, Galapagos mockingbird, Brown noddy tern.

SANTA FE 
Sacred Faith

BARRINGTON
Adm. Samuel Barrington

24

Blue – footed boody, Masked boody, Leaf – toed geckoes ( Phyllodatylus barringtonensis), Lava lizard (Tropidurus
Albemarlensis ), Land iguana (Conolophus pallidus), Giant tortoise.

PINZON 
Brothers Pinzón

DUNCAN
Adm. Viscount Duncan

18

Giant tortoise, Leaf – toed geckoes (Phyllodactylus galapagensis), Lava lizard (Tropidurus duncanensis), Dark, billed cuckoo.

GENOVESA
Génova, Italy

TOWER

14

Red – footed boody, swallow – toiled gull, Short – eared owe, Galápagos dove, Galápagos mockingbird. Great frigate bird

RABIDA 
La Rabida, Spain

JERVIS
Adm. John Jervis

4.9

Galapagos Hawk, Large tree finch, small tree finch, vegetarian finch, lava lizard (Tropidurus albemarlensis), Blue footed booby.

SEYMOUR NORTE 

NORTH SEYMOUR 
Lord High Seymour

1.9

Blue footed booby, Magnificent frigate bird, lava gull, Galapagos

WOLF 
Theodore Wolf, 
German geologist

WENNAN
Lord Wainman

1.3

Masked booby, red footed booby, Great frigate bird, Magnificent frigate bird, Brown noddy tern, Leaf-toed geckoes Phyllodactylus gilberti), Galapagos mockingbird.

DAPHNE 
HMS Daphne

DAPHNE MAJOR

0.32

Galapagos dove, Galapagos martin, Medium ground finch, Blue footed booby, masked booby, And Magnificent Frigate Bird.

PLAZA SUR 
President Leonidas Plaza

SOUTH PLAZA

0.13

Lava lizard (Tropidurus albemarlensis), Land iguana (cronolophus subcristatus), Madeiran storm petrel, Blue footed
Booby, Cactus ground finch, Small ground finch.

 

WHEN YOU ARRIVE TO THE AIRPORT OF QUITO OR GUAYAQUIL ON THE DAY OF YOUR GALAPAGOS TRIP

When you arrive at the Quito or Guayaquil airport, you will need to purchase your INGALA card ($20, CASH only) and go through luggage inspection (SIGAL) prior to flight check in. Once these steps are completed, please proceed to the ticket counter with your original passport and ticket for flight check-in.

Upon arrival to the Galapagos Islands, you will pay your park entrance fee ($100, CASH ONLY), and will meet your tour group outside the airport.  You will see a sign with the name of your yacht in Galapagos.  If you were provided with pins or stickers, please wear them when you arrive. 

From all of us, enjoy your cruise!!!

ANIMALS AND WILDLIFE

When it comes to widlife, no place on Earth compares to the Galapagos.  Dragons  that  dive  to  over  30  feet  beneath  the  waves  in  search  for  food,  penguins  over  one  thousand  miles  away from Antarctica, flightless birds that swim and fish underwater  like  bullet  torpedoes  and  prehistoric  giant  tortoises  with  elephant-like  feet  that  once  roamed  the  earth with dinosaurs, are just a small fraction of the nearly 9,000 species, most found nowhere else in the world, that make the Galapagos Islands a haven for life.The abundant wildlife that inhabits the archipelago year-round includes; boobies (blue, nazca and red), flightless cormorants,  flamingoes,  finches,  frigatebirds  (great  and magnificent), Galapagos hawks, iguanas (land and marine), Galapagos  penguins,  sea  lions,  fur  seals,  giant  tortoises,  dolphins, sea turtles, rays, whales and many more.There  are  a  a  handful  of  species  that  migrate  to  the  islands   including;   the   waved   albatross,   whale   sharks,   humpback whales and several other smaller bird species.

GALAPAGOS ALBATROSS

The Galapagos albatross (Phoebastria irrorata) – a seabird endemic of Ecuador – is the largest bird in the archipelago and the only albatross living in a tropical area. Males arrive on Española Island at the end of March to mate with other females until the arrival of their mate. The courtship is very eye-catching and includes a colorful dance. Later, the female will lay an egg that is cared for by both parents. These birds have an average lifespan of up to 40 years.

BLUE-FOOTED BOOBY

Known for the remarkable coloration of their anatomical features, blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii) move awkwardly on dry land but are incomparably agile in the air and when diving into the water to catch their prey. Because of their striking blue legs, as well as their mating dances, they are one of the most popular species among visitors to the islands. Females are usually larger than males, reaching 90 centimeters in length. Although the most important breeding colonies are those of Española and North Seymour islands, the blue-footed booby can be observed throughout the archipelago.

NAZCA BOOBY

The Nazca booby (Sula granti) is the largest booby in the Galapagos. Covered in white plumage, orange beak, masked eyes, and black legs, the Nasca booby is the most competitive of its species. These birds nest mainly along the coastline, approximately up to 100 m inland on the island of Genovesa. Chicks regularly commit cainism, pushing the younger brother or sister out of the nest without parental intervention. The main nesting colonies are in Genovesa and Española, but these birds can also be seen on the routes of the other itineraries.

RED-FOOTED BOOBIES

Species of limited distribution: found in Genovesa, Punta Pitt (San Cristóbal), North Seymour and, in small quantities, on an islet in Floreana.

Despite being one of the most numerous species in the archipelago, the red-footed booby (Sula Sula) is ironically the hardest to see. The best itineraries to see this species are those that include Genovesa and Punta Pitt in San Cristóbal, but it occasionally appears in other peripheral areas of the archipelago as it feeds in the open sea. Its light blue beak and legs are a characteristic red color with white nails. Legged boobies usually build nests in shrubs or tree branches.

GALAPAGOS CORMORANT

Limited distribution species: found only in Fernandina and on the western coast of Isabela.

The Galapagos cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi) is one of the rarest, largest, and only cormorants in the world because it is the only seabird, other than penguins, that has lost its ability to fly. Adaptations in its body include solid bones and feathers that lack lubricant, resembling fur more. During mating, the roles of their partners are partially reversed, so females assume leadership and become more active.

AMERICAN FLAMENCO

The subpopulation of the American flamingo  , also known as the Galapagos flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber), is considered highly vulnerable. It nests in the brackish lagoons of the island: 70% is found in the Quinta Playa em Isabela lagoon and  the remaining 30% is distributed in other lagoons of Isabela, Floreana, Santiago and Bainbridge Islet.

The male flamingo is slightly larger than the hembrea, while the adult is more reddish or pinkish than the young. The first nesting occurs at 5 years of age, usually in the month of July. Both parents take care of the egg.

FRIGATES: COMMON AND MAGINIFICA

It is unusual for two different species of frigate birds to coexist side by side, as is the case in Galapagos with the frigate bird (Fregata minor) and the frigate bird magnifica (Fregata magnificens), the larger of the two. Both species get most of their food while flying, sometimes stealing from other seabirds, which has earned them the nickname "sky pirates." Frigate birds can be seen at all Galapagos sight sites, although the largest nesting colonies are in San Cristobal, Española and Genovesa.

GAVILAN FROM GALAPAGOS

The Galapagos sparrowhawk (Buteo galapagoensis), an endemic bird of prey, is found at the top of the archipelago. Although it lacks natural enemies, it is a vulnerable species. Its main food is the lava lizard, but it also houses juvenile land and marine iguanas, newborn giant and sea turtles, and insects such as lobsters and centipedes. They can hunt in groups of up to three and sometimes feed on carrion. Females are larger and more powerful than males. Its natural territories include Fernandina, Española, Santiago, Isabela, and Santa Fe.

LAND IGUANA

Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus subcristatus) play an important role as resident endemic herbivores. Their mostly vegetarian eating habits are responsible for the dispersal of numerous succulent plants. Since they feed mostly on plants (especially cacti), they can survive for long periods without drinking water. The nesting periods of this species vary between islands.

IGUANA MARINA

The marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) is one of the most incredible species in the Galapagos. Few species show adaptations as astonishing as these iguanas, as they arrived as land iguanas, evolved to adapt to their marine environment, and expanded throughout the archipelago. They inhabit all the Galapagos Islands, but are found nowhere else in the world. Their life expectancy, approximately 40 years, is shorter than that of land iguanas.

 

IGUANA DE SANTA FE

The Santa Fe land iguana (Conolophus pallidus) is distinguished by its brownish coloration, smallerdorsal spines, and a more elongated snout than that of its cousin, the land iguana. Its entire world population is limited to the 24km2 (9.3mi2) Santa Fe Island. This distribution problem contributes significantly to their vulnerability. Their diet consists mostly of cactus prickly pear and occasionally insects and carrion. The pesky parasites that frequently affect their reptiles are the food of Darwin's finches.

GALAPAGOS PENGUIN

The Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculos) is the only one of its species that lives on the equator. It is the second smallest penguin in the world and,  unlike its relatives, has no fixed mating season. As a result of this, she lays up to 3 eggs a year, when food is plentiful. The  Galapagos penguin population  is at risk due to human activity and weather events in recent years.

GALAPAGOS FUR SEAL

The Galapagos fur seal (Zalophus wollebaeckii) is a particularly interesting species of pinniped: living on the equator, it is exposed to more heat and less food than other populations of the same species that live in colder climates. This is the smallest species of fur seal, with females passing around 75 kg (165 lb), and males weighing up to 200 kg (440 lb). Their ancestor arrived in the archipelago approximately 1.2 million years ago, and although they are distributed throughout the archipelago, the population is denser in the central islands.

GALAPAGOS FUR WOLF

The Galapagos fur wolf (Arctocetocephalus galapagoensis) is the smallest pinniped species in the world, with females weighing around 30 kg (66 lb) and males weighing around 80 kg (176 lb). It is a species that lives mostly in Fernandina and on the west side of Isabela, but can be seen in other parts of the Galapagos, especially in Puerto Egas, North Seymour and Genovesa.

GALAPAGOS GIANT TORTOISE

The Galapagos giant tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra) is the largest tortoise species in the world, weighing up to 25 kg (500 lb). These gentle giants move slowly and heavily, grazing through the foliage. The shape of its shell varies from island to island, and in Isabela it varies from volcano to volcano.

Turtles can live for more than 100 years. Despite the fact that their population declined drastically due to human activity, the breeding and protection programs of the National Park and the Charles Darwin Station have achieved a recovery.

WHAT TO BRING TO THE ENCHANTED ISLANDS?

Important Articles that you will have to bring to the Galapagos Islands


•    Sun hat with wide brim
•    Small Backpack
•    Shorts (2)
•    Short and Light Shirts (4)
•    Light Pants (2)
•    Sweater (1)
•    Windbreaker (1)
•    Jacket or rain poncho (1)
•    Good sports shoes for walking (1)
•    Beach sandals (1 pair)
•    Sunglasses
•    Bathing suit or swimwear
•    Camera and camcorder
•    Binoculars


CLIMATE IN THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS 

The climate in the Galapagos Island is the result of a unique combination of ocean currents, winds and geographic landforms. Diverse microclimates may exist within the same island and certainly, each island may experience quite different weather conditions.There are only 2 seasons in the Galapagos Islands. The first one is known as the Dry Season and the second one is the Warm Season.
Dry Season:
The Garua season goes From June to December the dry season brings a more humid and hotter climate. The temperature varies from 78ºF to 84ºF during the day and form 70ºF to 76ºF at night. During the day there is a little precipitation which lasts in between 1 and 2 hours. The Humbolt current makes the sea temperature cooler the currents calmer and the winds lighter. Cloudy days and a small drizzle. This actually makes  the climate fresher so dont expect all sunny days but a cooler weather for the hiking , no need of A/C or fan during the night and almost no mosquitoes. The colder wáter brings more plancton and more wildlife, this is the best time of the year to spot whales during the boat transports.

Warm Season:
From December to May the warm season brings cloudier skies and a more tropical weather. The temperature varies from 68F TO 76F. The current of El Niño makes the sea temperature warmer so it is perfect to snorkel and swim. Precipitation is common during this season. Days can be really hot (more than 30 degrees) and the wáter is warm due to Panama current entering in the islands marine reserve. No need for a wetsuit , sunny days, if you need to warm up from the Winter back home, this is the good season! Expect heavy tropical rains that can last 1 to 3 hours  ( really, we have not  that much days with rain all day long, it can happen but not on all islands at the same time). Due to the rains all the islands are greener.  In between these two seasons would be the transition time where you can have a bit of both seasons!
TIPS: if you do not depend on kids holidays, try to travel in low season: September-October,  February, or May-June: you have less people on the visitor sites and still enjoy the same fauna/flora as the rest of the year
 

Galapagos Natural Events Calendar


JANUARY

The rainy season begins.
Ideal time for snorkeling.
Land birds start to nest, usually after the first rains.
The temperature of the air and the water rises and it stays warm until June.
On Española Island: adult marine iguanas become nicely colored.
The green sea turtles arrive on beaches to lay eggs.
Land iguanas begin to breed on Isabela Island.

FEBRUARY

Nesting season for the Galapagos dove reaches its highest point.
On Floreana Island the greater flamingos start to nest.
Masked boobies on Hood are at the end of their nesting season.
The water reaches it highest temperature of 25C (77F). This temperature remains constant until April.
Several penguins are seen on Bartolome Island.
Marine iguanas nest on Santa Cruz Island.

MARCH

Marine iguanas nest on Fernandina.
Wet landing can be a challenge at places like Puerto Egas, Gardner Bay and Bartolome.
The rainy season reaches its highest pointy (not necessarily means that rains all day).
Snorkeling can be done for longer periods due to the water temperatures.
The air temperature can rise up to 30C (86F). Humidity is high.
Around mid-march is the beginning of summer time and marks the arrival of the waved albatross on Española.

APRIL

Green sea turtles’ eggs begin to hatch.
Good visibility under water while snorkeling.
Massive arrival of the waved albatross on Española.
One of the best months in Galapagos due to its weather, water temperature and wildlife.
End of the breeding season of the giant tortoises.
Eggs of land-iguanas start to hatch on Isabela.
The rain season end, but the islands stay green.

MAY

One of the best months in Galapagos due to its weather, water temperature and wildlife.
Water begins to get colder by mid-may.
Waved albatrosses on Española start to lay their eggs.
North Seymour's blue-footed boobies start their breeding season.
Sea turtles are still breeding on Gardner Bay and Punta Cormorant.
The Palo Santo trees start to lose their leaves.

JUNE

Southern migrants have started their journey to the North. Galapagos is a resting place for such birds. Some cetaceans follow the same patron.
Currents become stronger. The seas are wilder with bigger waves.
Beginning of the “garua” season (intermittent rains).
Giant tortoises on Santa Cruz Island migrate from the highlands to the lowlands looking for the best places for their nests.
Many red pouches of great male frigate birds are seen on North Seymour.
Some groups of humpback whales that migrate to the equator along the coasts of Ecuador can reach Galapagos.
Clouds begin forming on the mayor Islands.

JULY

Water temperature does not pass 21c (68F).
Seabirds are very active (breeding), especially the blue-footed boobies on Española.
“Cetaceans” (whales & dolphins) are seen more often, especially at the West coast of Isabela.
Cormorants show marvellous mating rituals on Fernandina.
Lava lizards start with their mating rituals until November.
Great month to see the four stages of the nesting of the Blue-footed boobies: eggs, chicks, juveniles and sub-adults.

AUGUST

Migrating coastal birds begin to arrive and stay on the island.
The “popping” season (birth) of the sea lions starts, especially on the Western and Central Islands.
Galapagos hawks mate on Española and Santiago (James).
Giant tortoises return to the highlands of Santa Cruz after nesting.
Masked boobies and Swallow-tailed gulls nest on Genovesa Island.
The temperature of the ocean drops to 18C (64F).
Oceans are quite unpredictable; currents are at their strongest level.

SEPTEMBER

Most seabirds stay quite active on their nesting places.
The air temperature reaches its lowest points (19C-66F).
Galapagos penguins show remarkable activity on Bartolome.
Swimmers on Bartolome can enjoy the penguins swimming around them.
The highest point of the cold season.
Sea lions are very active. Females have reached the estrus stage and because of this males are constantly barking and fighting.

OCTOBER

Giant Tortoises are still laying eggs.
Blue-footed boobies raise their chicks on Española and Punta Vicente Roca (Isabela).
Lava herons start to nest until March.
The Galapagos sea lions begin their mating period.
Sunrises can be very beautiful after the garua covers several locations of the Western volcanoes.
Days are not always sunny. Garua can be expected at most of the locations, except for the Western Islands where the days start foggy but after a couple of hours the sun takes over.
The summits are clear, but low hanging haze covers the coastal lines.

NOVEMBER

In general great weather because of the transition of one season to another. The birth of young sea lions is still happening.
Sea lions are sexually active on the Eastern part of the Archipelago.
"Band-rumped storm petrels" start their second nesting period.
Seas are calm. The temperature of the water rises slowly.
Good visibility under water for snorkeling.
The young sea lions (especially on Champion Islet) play aqua-aerobics next to the snorkelers.
Some types of jellyfish can be seen around the islands. The ‘genus Physalia’ is generally seen floating around Gardner and Tortuga Islets.

DECEMBER

The first waved albatrosses are raised.
The eggs of the giant tortoises start to hatch.
Great weather conditions.
The rainy season starts, all plants of the dry zone start to produce leaves.
Galapagos becomes greenish.

 

Climate Chart

 

MAX. TEMP

MIN. TEMP

SEA TEMP

MONTHS

ºC

ºF

ºC

ºF

ºC

ºF

January

27,7

82

24,4

76

22,8

73

February

29,4

85

23,3

74

25

77

March

30,6

87

22,8

73

25

77

April

29,4

85

22,8

73

25

77

May

27,7

82

21,7

71

24,4

76

June

26,1

79

18,9

66

23,3

74

July

24,4

76

19,4

67

22,2

72

August

23,9

75

18,9

66

21,7

71

September

23,9

75

19,4

67

21,7

71

October

25

77

19,4

67

22,2

72

November

25,6

78

20,6

69

22,8

73

December

26,7

80

21,1

70

23,3

74

 

Planning your trip :Guidelines for eco-friendly packing

 What we take with us when we travel is often an overlooked aspect of our trip planning, but it is equally important– and often says a lot about the sort of people we really are. Proper planning and packing offers an opportunity to make a difference in terms of the impact of your journey. Wise decisions about what ends up in your luggage can pay environmental dividends both while you are away, but also at home. Of course, much of what you pack depends on the nature of the trip, the destination and when you go, but even so, there are a few general guidelines to eco-friendly packing that are useful for any trip: 


Travel light The heavier your bags, the more fuel motorized transport (i.e. car, bus or plane) has to expend to get you to your destination—so try traveling light. Excess packaging and disposable goods are high on the list of things to avoid. In many areas of mainland Ecuador and the Galápagos, waste disposal presents major practical and economic difficulties – and there is little point in contributing to the problem. Remove all excess packaging before setting off for the more remote areas of the world – and recycle whatever you can of these materials while at home. 


Staying fresh and clean When it comes to personal hygiene – particularly if you plan to venture “off the beaten path” to more remote areas– bear in mind that the water you will be washing in may run directly back into the marine ecosystem or may be someone else’s drinking water. Avoid using conventional soaps, shampoos or detergents. There are a number of biodegradable (eco-friendly) cleaning agents and soaps available from shops and online retailers that can help overcome this problem. (For example, in the United States many camping and outdoor adventure supply stores such as EMS and REI sell biodegradable soaps and detergents. Other brands that offer biodegradable products are Kiss My Face, Dr. Bronners Magic Soap, and Whole Foods, just to name a few). 


Practice your “Eco-Logic” There are many practical ways to make a difference on a daily basis. For example: 
• Ask for glass cups and dinnerware instead of plastic when in a restaurant. 
• Opt for drinks in glass bottles, as these tend to be re-used, and do not require the use of a straw. 
• Take time to sit and enjoy a meal. Avoid fast food or take out and thus the disposable dinnerware/utensils that accompany it. 
• Bring your own reusable shopping bag whenever you need to make purchases. 
• Batteries are often one of the most damaging products that are left behind—if you take them in to Galápagos, please also take them out. 
• Be sensitive to limited resources like water, fuel and electricity. And so on … 
Bringing it home 
Remember, an eco-friendly attitude should not be limited to your time abroad! While the information presented here is important for reducing negative impacts during your travels, it is also necessary to take steps at home to adopt a more eco-friendly lifestyle. 

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